Tesla Supercharger Network Accounts for 60% of US DCFC Charging Ports

The Tesla Supercharger network accounted for 59.7% of the DC fast charging ports in the US, according to new analysis of November 30, 2022 Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) data by EVAdoption, LLC.

Tesla dominates the US with 15,683 DC fast charging ports located at 1,526 sites, for an average of 10.3 ports per site. The rest of the DC fast charging networks account for 40.3% of DCFC ports with 10,577 at 4,390 sites.

And the non-Tesla DC fast charging networks average only 2.4 ports per location, nearly 8 ports fewer than the average number of ports at Supercharger sites. On an overall basis, this amounts to an average of 4.4 DC fast charging ports to locations.

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2 Responses

  1. To be truly useful (fast) as a DCFC, the ports should be rated for at least 150 kW. I wonder what those stats look like if you parse it like that. So Many 50 and 60 kW non Tesla chargers out there at least where I live.

    1. Ray, thanks for the comment. So we had an earlier post that broke AFDC corridor data down by kW – https://evstatistics.com/2022/08/150-kw-and-50-kw-chargers-account-for-58-of-us-dcfc-corridor-ports/

      But I would argue that not all DC fast chargers need to be at least 150 kW. If someone is parked for a few hours at a shopping mall, a 50 or 62.5 or similar kW DCFC is perfect. And even if I am on a road trip and stop from a leisurely dinner for an hour or more, a 100 kW charger might be perfect. There is a correct use case for all levels of chargers (Level 2, Level 2, and DCFC) – the key is to make sure the charging speed is aligned with the location and use case.

      For example, airports have needs for Level 1 (PHEVs and BEVs parked for several days), Level 2 (same day travelers), lower-power DCFC (cell-phone lots so people can add some range while waiting, etc.) and higher-power DCFC (ride sharing/taxis). A 350 kW charger can cost from a low of about $220,000 to $420,000 to deploy. So we can deploy many more chargers of all levels when allocated to the right sites and use cases. https://evadoption.com/how-many-ev-charging-stations-will-10-billion-buy-for-america/

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