150 kW and 50 kW Chargers Account for 58% of US DCFC Corridor Ports

While charging networks like Electrify America are adding a large number of 350 kW DC fast chargers, based on AFDC data, 58.4% of US corridor (e.g, chargers located along highway corridors) DC fast chargers are either 150 kW or 50 kW. As of July 30, 2022, only 10.9% were the high-power 350 kW chargers.

Adding in the 13.2% of 62 kW chargers, then 71.6% are between 50 kw and 150 kW.

When combining the chargers by range of power level, 86% of US corridor DC Fast Chargers are 150 kw or below, and 14% are 160 kW or higher. The largest range by power level is 50-99 kW, which accounts for more than 4 out of every 10 (41.4%) corridor DC fast chargers.

AFDC Corridor DCFC By Power Level 7.30.22-v2-chart

Starting late 2022, the $5 billion National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) federal funding will begin the first year of allocation to all 50 states with a requirement of at least 4, 150 kW DC fast chargers per highway corridor site. This in effect makes 150 kW the new standard for minimum DC fast charger power level, and so we should see 150 kW chargers grow to around 50% market share in a few years from the near 30% today.

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